Leading Blog






03.26.12

YESability: Driving Growth with Yes

Business at the Speed of Now
In a world that is moving from a global economy driven by mass production to one driven by mass customization—a now economy—the demand for mass ingenuity, mass engagement, and mass action, has never been greater.

In Business at the Speed of Now, author John Bernard says that there must also be a shift in the way we manage our organizations. “Centralized innovation and decision-making, the mainstays of the Mass Production era, simply cannot get results in a world where unlimited choice demands real-time response.” What is required is leadership at all levels—“one that enables employees at all levels to solve problems and seize opportunities autonomously and instantaneously.”

To navigate this shift from mass production to mass customization people need the freedom to sieve every opportunity to solve problems quickly and efficiently. This requires a move from what Bernard calls “then” thinking to “now” thinking. “Then relies heavily on centralized control and specialization, whereas now relies heavily on decentralized autonomous action.” It requires a YES mindset. It means “ensuring that the people who first encounter customer problems possess the tools, skills, information, and authority they need to say yes now—YESability.

YESability doesn’t mean anarchy. Bernard explains, “Replacing no with yes does not mean that from now on you give everyone permission to do whatever they want. You draw clear boundaries to establish order, and you provide language and methods people can use to solve problems. You become an enabler of action rather than an unwitting obstacle to performance.

Every employee must be provided with five crucial elements:
  1. Context (“Where are we going?”)
  2. Accountability (“What role do I play?”)
  3. Skills (“What abilities do I possess?”)
  4. Facts (“What data must I access to make decisions?”)
  5. Authority (“Do I enjoy the freedom to act without fear of reprisal?”)
YESability is important for developing leaders at all levels. While Bernard’s focus is on customer relations, it is important to think of his approach in terms of interactions within the organization.

The 9 Rules of THENThe 11 Rules of NOW
Follow orders even when they make no sense.Listen to your customer carefully.
Keep your mouth shut and your opinions to yourself.Keep the company goals in mind.
Please your boss because he/she controls your future.Measure your performance.
Do not challenge management or you will be labeled a troublemaker.Access the data you need.
Blame others when things go wrong.Use data to make good and speedy decisions.
Do not waste company time on social media.Understand what your decision costs.
Punch the clock and leave your work at the office.Do not hide problems or they will go unsolved.
Never complain, never explain, except after work.First please the customer, not your boss.
Say no to customers who demand an exception to company policy.Do not be afraid because your boss has your back.
Honor the process not the department.
Strive always to say yes to customers.
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Posted by Michael McKinney at 11:47 PM
| Comments (0) | This post is about General Business



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